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PIDapalooza 2019 has ended
Are you ready to PID-party!?!?  Join us at the Bernard Shaw Pub on Tuesday night at 7pm for some pre-PID festivities.  See you there!

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Tuesday, January 22
 

7:00pm

Let's Get This PID Party Started
The PID fun starts now -- everyone is welcome to meet up for some drinks and a bit of the craic in the beer garden of the Bernard Shaw pub from 7: 00 pm on January 22 - cash bar, with food available. Don’t worry - it’s covered and heated!



Tuesday January 22, 2019 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Bernard Shaw 11-12 South Richmond St, Dublin 2
 
Wednesday, January 23
 

9:30am

Welcome and Lighting of the Eternal Flame
Welcome and Scene-Setting From the Organizers

Wednesday January 23, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
Main Stage

10:00am

Plenary: PIDs, Petabytes and Neutrons
Neutron science generates an exploding volume of scientific research data which needs to be managed under FAIR data principles. The European Spallation Source (ESS), is expected to generate tens of petabytes of data per year.

This volume of scientific research data benefits from a “PIDcentric” approach to manage the many science users, data sets and instruments.

In partnership with the Swiss and Swedish national synchrotron radiation facilities at PSI and MAXIV, ESS have developed SciCat, a new data catalogue. SciCat allows users to register and access data using persistent identifiers.

SciCat users are identified using the ORCID database, published datasets are identified using DOIs and  for raw and derived datasets, handle.net identifiers are used.

SciCat uses a document-oriented database, MongoDB, which allows datasets to be tagged with ad hoc, unstructured scientific metadata as well as traditionally structured metadata, which can then be recovered using the DOI or Handle.

In the day to day operations, SciCat also has to deal with the problem of legacy scientific research data. Legacy data with incomplete or lost metadata presents a challenge to include in data catalogue. In my session, I will talk about the ESS’s experiences with PIDs, data catalogues and legacy data.

Speakers
avatar for Gareth Murphy

Gareth Murphy

Data Curation Scientist, European Spallation Source ERIC
Gareth is a Data Curation Scientist at the European Spallation Source. Previously, he was a software developer at DTU Space, and postdoctoral researcher at Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, and Institute de... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 10:00am - 10:45am
Main Stage

10:45am

Break
Wednesday January 23, 2019 10:45am - 11:00am

11:00am

PIDs in Dublin Core
The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) acts as steward for the ubiquitous Dublin Core Metadata Terms[^1]. Over the last few months, DCMI has been approached, independently, by several organisations (all working int he area of scholarly communications) seeking a recommendation on how best to represent PIDs with Dublin Core properties in XML-based metadata records. As an activity, scholarly communications still relies heavily on the exchange of metadata in XML, and properties from the Dublin Core vocabularies are widely used in this metadata. DCMI's response to this was to start a discussion, beginning with the gathering of "user-stories", leading to a position paper which was created to seed discussion at a working meeting at the DCMI conference in Porto in September 2018. Several key organisations with an interest in this space (e.g. CrossRef, ORCID, OpenAIRE, Elsevier etc.) were represented at the meeting. The discussion was very fruitful, and a broad consensus was reached. This presentation will present the consensus view from that meeting, offering a candidate recommendation for the general treatment of PIDs with Dublin Core properties in XML-based metadata, with a few worked examples from familiar use-cases in the domain of scholarly-communications.

[^1]:    [http://www.dublincore.org/documents/dcmi-terms/](http://www.dublincore.org/documents/dcmi-terms/)

Speakers
avatar for Paul Walk

Paul Walk

Antleaf Ltd. and DCMI
Paul Walk is Founder and Director of Antleaf, a digital consultancy, which delivers technical consultancy, management and development services, primarily to higher education and research. Some examples of current/recent activity include: acting as Managing Director of the Dublin Core... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:25am
Main Stage

11:00am

Community Engagement in FREYA
The European Commission-funded FREYA project (www.project-freya.eu) began in November 2017. It aims to extend the infrastructure for persistent identifiers to ensure that PIDs become a core component of open research in the European Union and around the world. This presentation will be delivered by a FREYA project representative from the British Library, and a FREYA Ambassador.

Section One (10 mins)
Community outreach is a vital part of the FREYA project. We need our material to make sense to librarians, policy-makers and researchers in disciplines ranging from nuclear physics to medieval history. In this section we’ll talk with you about our approach to community engagement, the evolution of the FREYA Knowledge Hub, our ambassador programme, and our quest for the perfect answer to that recurring question “what is a PID, and why should I care?”

Section Two (15 mins) "What are we DOIng about the out-of-copyright literature?"
Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) have revolutionised the way we locate, access, cite, share and track scholarly content. Every journal article that receives a DOI becomes part of a great linked network of research. Efforts are now being made to bring the historic literature, much of which is now online, into this linked network. However, as there are no rules or guidelines around registering DOIs for out-of-copyright content, this is raising serious issues around access.

Crossref’s Member Obligations<https://www.crossref.org/member-obligations/> state that “You must have the necessary rights for the content you register”. There is no mention of how members should proceed if there are no rights. This means that, under the current DOI system, anyone can assign a DOI to an out-of-copyright journal article, and there is nothing stopping them from putting “their” DOI’d version of that out-of-copyright article behind a paywall.

The major scholarly commercial publishers have now uploaded and assigned DOIs to thousands of out-of-copyright articles, many going back as far as the 1700s. If you want to access them, you need to pay (these include articles by Charles Darwin<https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.1862.tb01223.x> and Alfred Russell Wallace<https://doi.org/10.1080/00222935708680675>). In many cases, open access versions of this content exist on other websites (such as on the Biodiversity Heritage Library<https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/>), but anyone citing these articles must quote the DOI (as per their Crossref agreements) and thus point their readers to the versions behind paywalls.

There is no doubt that bringing this historic literature into the DOI system has made it infinitely more discoverable, citable and trackable, but at what cost?


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Kearney

Nicole Kearney

Manager, Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) Australia, Museums Victoria
Zoologist and science communicator working to make Australia's biodiversity heritage literature openly accessible and discoverable for everyone. @nicolekearney
avatar for Ricarda Braukmann

Ricarda Braukmann

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
EF

Eliane Fankhauser

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
FM

Frances Madden

Research Identifiers Lead, British Library
Frances Madden is Research Identifiers Lead at The British Library, overseeing the BL's contribution to the FREYA project. Her role includes looking at integrating persistent identifiers into the BL's systems and representing the humanities and social sciences sectors within FREYA... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:25am
Stage 2

11:00am

Social Impact Needs PID to Run the World
The European Commission tendency towards evaluating the social impact of research of the new Horizon Europe Framework set a new way of doing research. By understanding social impact as those results that have improved and benefited society, we need indicators to measure it and evidence to corroborate it. Linking a PID to a social impact will definitively simplify social impact tracking and will provide, along with the Social Impact Open Repository (SIOR*), a new strategy to make research efficient in order to contribute to the improvement of the society.
*http://sior.ub.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Joan Cabre

Joan Cabre

Researcher, SIOR. Social Impact Open Repository


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:25am
Stage 1

11:30am

NARCIS & Freya: Can PIDs contribute to Research in Context?
NARCIS, the national gateway to scholarly information in the Netherlands (www.narcis.nl) contains information about publications, datasets, research projects, researchers and organizations. NARCIS is an aggregated from various different sources; repositories, CRIS’s (Current Research Information System) and other sources such as funders. One of the aims of NARCIS is to show Research Information in its context. For a publication, context can mean one or more relations to different information types: the underlying data, the project, its funding or related publications. Relationships between the different information types provide essential context to research. Although this can seem to be a straightforward task, in practice there are many challenges. Especially in information exchange and aggregating information from different sources, PIDs are the only way to relate objects sustainably. In this session, we will discuss the possibilities of PID-Graphs by comparing  NARCIS PID Graphs with ORCID PID Graphs as part of the  EU project FREYA.

Speakers
avatar for Maaike de Jong

Maaike de Jong

Project leader, Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
Maaike de Jong develops and manages international projects on research data infrastructures and open science at DANS. She currently leads the engagement work package of FREYA, an EU project on persistent identifiers. She has a background in biological sciences and continues her involvement... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:30am - 11:55am
Stage 2

11:30am

p(id)-2-p(id): bridging PIDs to the p2p, Content-Addressed Web?
At the risk of causing some respected members of the Pidapalooza community to stab themselves in the eyeball (see https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5914312.v1), this session will explore content-addressing of research outputs through the Interplanetary FileSystem (IPFS) and how this approach relates to existing persistent identifier infrastructures.
 
Research data is driving some new PID requirements. Linking versioned DOIs has been explored in various working groups and implemented on various popular platforms (Figshare, Zenodo, F1000). There is also renewed interest in the idea of data packaging (https://rd-alliance.org/approaches-research-data-packaging-rda-11th-plenary-bof-meeting)  and research objects (http://www.researchobject.org/ro2018/) in RDA and related groups as a practical means of bundling data with its metadata in a way that can be easily cited and transmitted as a single payload. Finally, several groups are exploring how best to directly reference content in PID metadata using cryptographic hashing. For example, the Freya project is looking at how best to allow “direct access to content associated with a DOI” (see https://github.com/datacite/freya/issues/2) and RDA is tackling similar issues in the PID Kernel Information Working Group (https://www.rd-alliance.org/groups/pid-kernel-information-wg). This all suggests an appetite for greater consensus around linking PIDs to versioned (and therefore immutable), self-describing, directly accessible content.
 
The tl;dr of IPFS is that all content on the web/network can be referenced not by where it is located (a particular server or server farm, referenced by a DNS/domain lookup), but by cryptographic identifiers derived from the content itself, allowing the protocol to retrieve the desired information from any node on the network, and removing some of the issues with content moving and drifting on the web. Like bittorrent, git and many others before it, cryptographic hashing plays a key role here, but IPFS aims to make this a ubiquitous, general purpose network protocol, comparable to HTTP URLs. Hashing digital content as a means of ensuring fixity/integrity of content will be familiar to Pidapalooza participants. Moreover, people working in the digital repository and cloud storage space, may well work with content-addressed storage of one form or another. However, the prospect of (relatively) widespread use of peer-to-peer content-addressing at web/network-level, as exemplified in particular by the Interplanetary File System (IPFS; ipfs.io), raises some interesting possibilities for how we manage and cite research data.

On the face of it, IPFS bakes *some* of the core PID use-cases, in particular handling location change and/or multi-resolution, right into the fabric of the network. However, by itself, IPFS is not a panacea. For example, although IPFS has built in ways to update hashing algorithms to deal with future hash collisions, this isn’t much good if you’ve cited something using a now broken hash. IPFS also has emerging specifications for metadata registry and for a mutable namespace to cater for updated content but again, from a PID perspective, these re-introduce some of the fragility of the HTTP web and also some of the familiar requirements for transparent, multi-stakeholder, and relatively centralised governance models that make PID schemes so trusted today.
This season will introduce the peer-to-peer content-addressed approach, exploring its benefits and weaknesses in terms of persistence and, using the Bilder-Fenner framework (https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5914312.v1) as a basis, discuss how IPFS and related approaches can both leverage PID infrastructure and in turn be leveraged by PID infrastructures to address particular content distribution and referencing requirements.

Speakers
EO

Eoghan Ó Carragáin

UCC
I work on research data and open science at University College Cork Library, and chair the Infrastructure Working Group of Ireland’s National Open Research Forum. I previously worked at the National Library of Ireland as a software developer building a digitisation workflow and... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:30am - 11:55am
Stage 1

11:30am

DIDs are PIDs
Decentralized IDentifiers are an emerging standard coming from the user-centric Identity community centered on the Internet Identity Workshop. This standard is designed to support individuals owning and controlling their own identifiers and the verifiable claims associated with them. This talk gives a survey of the core technologies and invites a conversation about how it relates to the wider PID community. 

Speakers
avatar for Markus Sabadello

Markus Sabadello

CEO, Danube Tech
Markus Sabadello has been a pioneer and leader in the field of digital identity for many years and has contributed to cutting-edge technologies that have emerged in this space. He has been an early participant of decentralization movements such as the Federated Social Web, Respect... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 11:30am - 11:55am
Main Stage

12:00pm

Documenting Identifiers for Humans and Machines
Getting people to adopt standard identifiers is hard. We make it harder by not documenting or describing them in useful ways. How do I choose between a UPRN, UARN or UDPRN? What even are they?

Getting machines to do things with identifiers is hard for similar reasons. How can we make it easier for them to find, index and convert between identifiers?

In this talk, we'll have a look at some of the issues and discuss some useful ways forward.

Speakers
LD

Leigh Dodds

Open Data Institute



Wednesday January 23, 2019 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Stage 2

12:00pm

To the Rescue of Scholarly Orphans
The Scholarly Orphans project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, explores technical approaches aimed at capturing and archiving scholarly artifacts that researchers deposit in web productivity portals as a means to collaborate and communicate with their peers. These artifacts are not collected by other frameworks aimed at archiving the scholarly record (e.g., LOCKSS, Portico, Institutional Repositories) and are only incidentally captured by web archives. The project explores an institution-driven approach inspired by web archiving. To demonstrate the ongoing thinking, the project has devised an experimental automated pipeline that continuously discovers, captures, and archives artifacts. These are created by actual researchers who, for the purpose of the experiment, were virtually enlisted in a fictive research institution. A portal at myresearch.institute provides an overview of the artifacts that were discovered and provides access to archived versions stored in both an institutional and a cross-institutional archive. The set-up leverages a range of  technologies that share a flavor of persistence: Memento, Memento Tracer, Robust Links, Signposting.

Speakers
HV

Herbert Van de Sompel

DANS
Herbert Van de Sompel started his career as head of library automation at Ghent University. After leaving Ghent, he was Visiting Professor in Computer Science at Cornell University, Director of e-Strategy and Programmes at the British Library, and information scientist at the Los... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Stage 1

12:00pm

How PID are DOI's
In this presentation, we will talk about the results of an analysis of doi’s from real life systems - with emphasis on invalid doi’s.  The analysis is based on a representative sample from approximately 500.000 doi's from app. 80 different institutions (research institution and funders).  The non-matched doi’s are categorised as 1) valid doi’s not covered by Dimensions, 2) valid doi’s that resolve as a dead link and 3) invalid doi’s that are non-resolvable.  The analysis is ongoing and hence categorisation and sub-categorisation is in development.  DOI is one of the best adopted PID we have - and hence a PID which can trigger interesting discussion points based on real-life usage of PID’s

Speakers
avatar for Brian Kirkegaard Lunn

Brian Kirkegaard Lunn

Senior Metadata Manager, Digital Science - Dimensions
Data in Dimensions.ai



Wednesday January 23, 2019 12:00pm - 12:25pm
Main Stage

12:30pm

Lunch
Wednesday January 23, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm

1:30pm

Transitioning an Identifier System to Persistence
It is easy to build an identifier system, a huge challenge to achieve broad adoption, and even more challenging to ensure it will persist. We will discuss the benefits and challenges of transitioning an existing PID system to a mature, sustainable organization and service using the example of the IGSN, a PID for physical samples, originally built within the Geoscience community. The IGSN has seen a rapid increase in adoption, including outside the Geosciences, but its current business model and technical architecture lack sustainability and scalability. The IGSN has started a major strategic planning effort funded by the Sloan Foundation to develop a mature organizational structure and technical architecture that is scalable, extensible to other domains. and ensures persistence. This session aims to bring together members from other PID community who are interested in sharing experiences and ideas about transitioning a PID system to persistence that could lead to more general guidelines.

Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany.Over... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Main Stage

1:30pm

Silly humans, metadata is for machines -- how and why we need to fix this!
In our current era, machine-readable metadata is just as important, if not more so, than human-readable metadata. Machine-based researcher evaluation and researcher identification can have huge effects on the course of a researcher career. Some publishers concentrate on the machine-readable layer to the detriment of the human-readable bit, while others find themselves on the opposite side of the divide. Instead of PIDs falling somewhere on this machine or human readable-spectrum in accordance with the whim of the publisher, we need to start making PID metadata consistent for both humans and machines. This presentation will explain the issue, critically examine current conventions, such as PID landing pages and content negotiation, and provide suggestions on ensuring that humans and machines are always exposed to the same metadata. We’ll even go so far as to look at radically new patterns such as a “shared machine/human annotation layer” that can expose updates, corrections, and retractions. Join Heather Staines (Hypothesis) and Will Simpson (ORCID) discuss how this idea should be brought to life. 

Speakers
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, Hypothes.is
 


Wednesday January 23, 2019 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Stage 1

1:30pm

I Know What You Did Last Autumn – Or: How to Choose the Right Conference?
Imagine a little horror story: You, a researcher, wake up one morning feeling old and tired and remembering an earlier, more ambitious version of yourself. What went wrong? You recall your first bad choice of a conference, a meeting you attended as a graduate student where nobody understood your research project; you remember all the time that you spent reviewing myriads of conference submissions without ever getting any credit for it; you remember how you lost more and more colleagues who just went away to attend a conference and never came back… because they chose a suitable one, met the right people there and ended up moving on to better places. And you ask yourself if you could have been spared all this misery if you had a tool that would have helped you identifying the conferences that were right for you. Our initiative aims to develop an interdisciplinary, open and reliable service for finding and publishing data on scientific conferences. Following the FAIR principles, one of its objectives is to assign persistent identifiers for conferences. It will also identify quality criteria for conferences and represent them in their environment: as part of a network of institutions, researchers, other conferences, proceedings etc. This will help not only to reduce ambiguity of conference titles but also to give researchers more acknowledgement for conference related work.

Speakers
SH

Stephanie Hagemann-Wilholt

Technische Informationsbibliothek


Wednesday January 23, 2019 1:30pm - 1:55pm
Stage 2

2:00pm

PIDforum.org - a new global discussion platform about PIDs
Imagine a virtual meeting place for all PID aficionados, a place to discuss anything that has to do with PIDs, to announce events, to ask questions, to share ideas; a place to go when you just can't stop talking about PIDs and your colleague or your cat doesn't want to hear it anymore. Sound amazing? We think so too!

Imagine no more: we're excited to announce the launch of the PID Forum during PIDapalooza 2019. The PID Forum is open to everyone, although stemming from a Project FREYA discussion including partners such as DataCite, Crossref, and ORCID. We aim to make it THE global online discussion platform for all things PID-related in the research world. During this interactive session, we ask you, the community, for your involvement in starting up the PID Forum and making it a success. We will discuss what kind of topics and information you'd like to see on the forum, how to make the PID Forum as global and inclusive as possible, how to best engage the wider community and more.

Last but not least, if you sign up to the PID Forum during PIDapalooza you have a chance of winning a ticket for PIDapalooza 2020!

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Community Outreach, Crossref
avatar for Maaike de Jong

Maaike de Jong

Project leader, Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
Maaike de Jong develops and manages international projects on research data infrastructures and open science at DANS. She currently leads the engagement work package of FREYA, an EU project on persistent identifiers. She has a background in biological sciences and continues her involvement... Read More →
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCIte
GH

Ginny Hendricks

Director of Member and Community Outreach, Crossref


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Stage 1

2:00pm

5 Steps Towards a Dream State: Persistent & Open Data Metrics
To standardize the counting and expose the reach of research data, Make Data Count has focused on building open infrastructure for scholarly communications research data usage and citation counts. Our intention has always been to build open infrastructure that enables the analysis and building of proper data level metrics, to truly value each data PID. While implementing this infrastructure we have exposed barriers and feats necessary for the community to address in implementing metrics that are valuable and feasible for research data. Join us for a discussion on the five steps we believe are necessary that the community towards building, implementing, and advocating for data usage and data citation before we can really have "data-level metrics" and move towards a value system for research data.

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center, California Digital Library - CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library - CDL


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Stage 2

2:00pm

Openness Profile: mobilizing PIDs to increase visibility of open scholarship
Implementation of open scholarship is increasingly confronted by a misalignment between contemporary research evaluation protocols and the expectations of new research policies that privilege broad opening of all stages of research. In this presentation we introduce the openness profile[1], a bottom-up approach that draws on PID infrastructure to make visible a diverse range of contributions to openness. More concretely, the openness profile is conceived as a collection of documented contributions to open scholarship with a DOI (or a collection of DOI’s with a RAiD[2]), which is linked to the contributor’s ORCID iD[3]. By intervening at the level of infrastructure, the openness profile is situated to provide resources that are useful to those presently contributing to open scholarship while also being available for, and adaptable to, future changes enacted by top-down research policy initiatives. The main content of this presentation is concerned with sketching out the details of a pilot program.

[1] the Openness Profile concept is presently being developed by the Knowledge Exchange working group on Open Scholarship and Research Evaluation
[2] Research Activity identifier (RAiD): https://www.raid.org.au
[3] Open Researcher and Creator Identifier (ORCID): https://orcid.org
 

Speakers
avatar for Josh Brown

Josh Brown

Director, Partnerships, ORCID
 Josh works with stakeholders, with a focus on research funders and our partners, to support understanding and engagement, and promote adoption of ORCID.  He directs the operations of ORCID EU, leading the ORCID contribution to the THOR Project.  He was previously the ORCID Regional... Read More →
SM

Siobhann McCafferty

Australian Access Federation
Project Manager for the Data Life Cycle Framework Project (ARDC, AAF, AARNET) which is making better plumbing for Research Management with PIDs, Plugs and stores.  Based in Brisbane, Australia.
avatar for Clifford Tatum

Clifford Tatum

SURF & Leiden University
Clifford Tatum is a project manager at SURF in the Netherlands, focusing on Research Information in general and ORCiD implementation in particular. He is also a researcher at CWTS, Leiden University, focusing on Open Science infrastructure in relation to emerging evaluation pract... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:25pm
Main Stage

2:30pm

Community Meets Technology - National Level Identifier Services in Australia
As part of the strategy for "joined up" research in Australia, identifier services are included in the national research infrastructure. Service providers such as the Australian Research Data Commons (which includes the Australian National Data Service) and the Australian Access Federation raise awareness of and promote the benefits of connecting research through the use of persistent identifiers. We also provide tools, infrastructure or access to a number of identifier systems such as ORCID, Handle, DOI, IGSN, PURL, and RAID.

How do we engage institutions in adopting PIDs? We have a skills program that includes a heavy dose of PIDagogy of course! In our program of events from workshops to webinars we teach and persuade our community to adopt and use PIDs and make the most of our services. And when organisations want to implement or integrate, there is dedicated support and consultancy to make it easy. And funders are getting on board too to try and make as coherent a system as possible.  Sometimes our strategies have worked well and other times we’ve had more of a challenge. Though not perfect by any means the "Australian model" represents a holistic approach embracing technology, people, policy, infrastructure, support, and strategy.

Speakers
AB

Adrian Burton

Director, Data Policy and Services, ARDC
Adrian Burton is Director of Services, Policy, Collections with the Australian Research Data Commons, and has many years experience building and supporting national data policy, infrastructure, and services. 
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons is Associate Director, Skilled Workforce with the Australian Research Data Commons. She has many years experience building and supporting PIDs and PID services and is actively engaged in a wide range of PID infrastructure/initiatives such as Scholix, DataCite, IGSN... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Stage 2

2:30pm

Identifiers.org Compact Identifier Resolution Services

The Identifiers.org resolution system provides consistent access to life science data using Compact Identifiers (CIDs).  Compact Identifiers minimally consist of an assigned unique prefix and the accession number designated by the data provider (prefix: accession). CIDs can currently be dereferenced by 2 meta resolvers: identifiers.org and n2t.net. The final resolving location, using either meta resolver,  is ultimately determined using information that is stored in the Identifiers.org Registry, which contains high quality, manually curated information on over 700 data resources (largely databases). In addition to resolution, Identifiers.org provides a number of additional services, including the ability to harvest and display schema.org (and bioschemas)  metadata markup, using with ‘dataset’ and ‘data record’ profiles, through an Identifiers.org metadata service. 

Speakers
avatar for Sarala Wimalaratne

Sarala Wimalaratne

Project Lead, EMBL-EBI


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Main Stage

2:30pm

Implementation of Organizational IDs in NASA's ADS Abstract Service
After several years of effort, NASA's Astrophysics Data System (ADS) Abstract Service (http://adswww.harvard.edu) has implemented an affiliation component to literature searches in astronomy and physics.  We use a two-tier heierarchy of institutional identifiers based on Ringgold
data and modified for our corpus of data.  We have tentatively identified authors' institutions for approximately 95% of the 2.3 million astronomy abstracts and approximately 70% of the 9.4 million physics abstracts.  I will describe our journey, our current pit stop, and our final destination.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Grant

Carolyn Grant

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
I have been working at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics for over thirty years and have been programming for the ADS Abstract Service since its inception in 1992. I originally began working at CfA while an undergraduate at Harvard College and liked it so much I never... Read More →


Wednesday January 23, 2019 2:30pm - 2:55pm
Stage 1

3:00pm

Break
Wednesday January 23, 2019 3:00pm - 3:15pm

3:15pm

Presenting... ORCID-Orama at PIDapalooza!
Open in name and practice, ORCID is all about increasing transparency and trust in research information. Come and hear about our 2019 roadmap projects -- and how you can get involved! In a mix of formats -- demos, polls, stories, discussion, dance, inspired chaos -- ORCID staff will engage session participants in an exploration of our 2019, "The Year of the Researcher," projects:  

Person citations - inspiring person-centric information management
Academia and beyond - broadening community use of PIDs
Ongoing ORBIT - expanding funder contributions to the PIDscape
Assertion assurance - enabling trust through transparency
Improving the user experience - keeping the researcher firmly in control
ORCID as a personal database -  making research information open and reusable

Featuring ORCID staff Laure Haak (Executive Director), Josh Brown (Director of Partnerships), Matthew Buys (Director of Engagement), Alice Meadows (Director of Communications), Will Simpson (Director of Technology) - and more!

Speakers
avatar for Josh Brown

Josh Brown

Director, Partnerships, ORCID
 Josh works with stakeholders, with a focus on research funders and our partners, to support understanding and engagement, and promote adoption of ORCID.  He directs the operations of ORCID EU, leading the ORCID contribution to the THOR Project.  He was previously the ORCID Regional... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Buys

Matthew Buys

Director of Engagement, ORCID Inc.
 Matthew is responsible for driving ORCID sustainability through community engagement, membership, integration, and user adoption efforts following best practice. The engagement team supports our user and member communities to build ORCID as an international-scale research effort... Read More →
TD

Tom Demeranville

Product Director, ORCID
Tom ensures our technology is responsive to our community and aligned with our mission. He collaborates with internal and external stakeholders to identify innovation opportunities and manage ORCID’s technical roadmap. Tom most recently served as ORCID’s Technology Advocate, focusing... Read More →
avatar for Laure Haak

Laure Haak

Executive Director, ORCID
I care about effective infrastructures for supporting open research, scholarship, and innovation. Talk to me about persistent identifiers, researcher involvement in managing their own information, ensuring credit for a wide range of contributions, and privacy. Or the Packers... Read More →
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 
avatar for Eric Olson

Eric Olson

Engagement Lead, North America., ORCID
Eric supports ORCID members as they develop new and existing integrations and workflows. Before joining ORCID, Eric worked on the PressForward publishing software at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, where he recruited and trained research organizations to utilize... Read More →
WS

Will Simpson

Director, Technology, ORCID, Inc
Will is responsible for ORCID’s technical strategy, infrastructure, and scalability, and manages the technology team. WIll was a software consultant on the pre-launch team, joined the ORCID technology team after launch, and served as tech lead before his current role. Previously... Read More →
avatar for Ivo Wijnbergen

Ivo Wijnbergen

Manager, EMEA Engagement, ORCID
Ask me about authenticating iD's, using ORCID as a sign-in, integrating with our API, and generally anything relating to making research more transparent and trustworthy.


Wednesday January 23, 2019 3:15pm - 4:10pm
Main Stage

3:15pm

The Metadata Marching Band
Polishing the instruments, tuning up, gathering the sheet music, getting ready; Metadata 2020 has rapidly grown into a band of over 130 individuals; who, over the last 18 months have been committed to working together to affect big change - achieving consistency in metadata terminology; mapping between schemas, reviewing and curating existing information and guidance; creating tools for navigation; and producing resources in concert across several scholarly communications communities.  Metadata 2020 believes that to truly achieve consistency across multiple communities we must collaborate and pool our knowledge and resources so that we can all march to the beat of the same drum.  

We are nearly ready to perform, engaging multiple communities and providing with the tools they need to navigate metadata in scholarly communications. We need help from the ensemble of PID-supporters to add strength and volume to the chorus of our core message and help spread the word about metadata use and adoption - particularly among the research community who will see the biggest benefit from improvements - so that we can all sing from the same hymn sheet.

Speakers
JS

Jim Swainston

Senior Product Manager, Emerald Publishing


Wednesday January 23, 2019 3:15pm - 4:10pm
Stage 2

4:15pm

Plenary: Understanding URI Ecosystems
"No PID is an island, entire of itself"

Idealistic propaganda to the contrary notwithstanding, URIs are
neither unambiguous nor self-defining.  A URI's meaning depends on its
context of use and an implicit social contract among its minters,
distributors, servers and users.  Borrowing a term with origins in the
ethnography of the workplace, we can say that URIs depend on a
_community of practice_, the unwitting signatories to such a contract.

In this talk I will argue that as a community commited to promoting
PIDs, we need to understand the implications of this view of URIs,
because it also applies to (at least the actionable forms of) PIDs.

As my title suggests, there is not just one universal community of
practice within which URIs are made effective (c.f. Berners Lee's
"single, global information space"): there are many of them, and they do
_not_ all operate by the same rules.  Making a PID system work,
technically, but more importantly _socially_, so that the virtuous
circle of awareness, adoption and growth kicks in, requires that system
to occupy a viable niche in the space of possibilities afforded by at
least one _URI ecosystem_: a pattern of URI usage and the community of
practice which sustains it.

Speakers
avatar for Henry Thompson

Henry Thompson

Professor of Web Informatics, School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh


Wednesday January 23, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Main Stage

5:30pm

PIDapalooza Reception
Join us for drinks, nibbles, a PID pub quiz, and more at one of Dublin's most popular pubs! 


Wednesday January 23, 2019 5:30pm - 8:00pm
Upstairs at MVP 29 Upper Clanbrassil Street, Dublin 8
 
Thursday, January 24
 

9:30am

Welcome
Thursday January 24, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am

9:45am

PID Tribal Cultures
PIDs have their own communities, customs, visions, and beliefs about PID immortality. In this session we'll hear from some "tribal elders" on their challenges in keeping the eternal PID flame alive. They will also comment on the important things the communities have in common as we all look for avenues of ongoing collaboration and cooperation.

Speakers
avatar for John Kunze

John Kunze

Identifier Systems Architect, California Digital Library, University of California Office of the President
John Kunze is an Identifier Systems Architect at the California Digital Library. With a background in computer science and mathematics, he wrote BSD Unix software that comes pre-installed with Mac and Linux systems. He created the ARK identifier scheme, the N2T.net scheme-agnostic... Read More →
avatar for Sarala Wimalaratne

Sarala Wimalaratne

Project Lead, EMBL-EBI
JH

Juha Hakala

Librarian, National Library of Finland
AB

Adrian Burton

Director, Data Policy and Services, ARDC
Adrian Burton is Director of Services, Policy, Collections with the Australian Research Data Commons, and has many years experience building and supporting national data policy, infrastructure, and services. 


Thursday January 24, 2019 9:45am - 10:30am
Main Stage

10:30am

Break
Thursday January 24, 2019 10:30am - 10:45am

10:45am

What's that DOI? How Crossref Event Data identifies DOIs on the web
Event Data tracks how people discuss research on the web. We find links in Blogs, News aritlces, Tweets, Wikipedia and more. We're tracking content that has DOIs, and of course we use DOIs to identify the content so the content can be uniquely identified. But most people don't use them when referring to content. To do this we use a blend of methods. We try to balance a fiddly process with openness, transparent data that people can understand. This talk follows on from the research I presented at PIDapalooza in 2016, describing how this process works and how you could use it yourself.

Speakers
avatar for Joe Wass

Joe Wass

Crossref
Joe is a Principal R&D Engineer at Crossref. He spends most of his time building Event Data, open infrastructure for tracking and sharing non-traditional scholarly links. 


Thursday January 24, 2019 10:45am - 11:10am
Main Stage

10:45am

Let’s create a PIDapalooza Statement on Research Information Citizenship
In 2018, the PID community participated in a lightning workshop on Research Information Citizenship - What is it? Who are the Citizens? What are our expectations of good citizenship?

We collaboratively edited a google doc to get our thoughts into one place. Since then our thoughts have been reviewed and refined at workshops at VIVO 2018 , and as part of the FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) program.

The progress that has been made can be found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BmFRrijAO7efxzstco4lesK-r9hlWAKhvnQuTlilFGU/edit#heading=h.j326z7pn4gc9 

Now we need your help to craft an official PIDapalooza Statement on Research Information Citizenship that we can use to start spreading the word in the PID community and beyond.

Come along to our lightning session to brainstorm the statement with us - let’s make this thing happen!

Speakers
avatar for Simon Porter

Simon Porter

VP Academic Relationships and Knowledge Architecture, Digital Science
Simon Porter is the Director of Innovation at Digital Science. Three years ago, Simon came to Digital Science from the University of Melbourne, where he worked for 15 years in roles spanning the Library, Research Administration, and Information Technology. Beginning from a core strength... Read More →
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 


Thursday January 24, 2019 10:45am - 11:10am
Stage 2

10:45am

Who Moved my Institution? A Data Integration Story
At APS we succeeded in integrating GRID PID's for organizations into our author-facing institutional database this past year. I'll describe how we did it, some of the benefits, some of the challenges, and some of the feedback we've received from our users. There's still a lot more we'd like to do with persistent institutional identifiers, so I'll also talk about the road still ahead.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Smith

Arthur Smith

American Physical Society
Arthur Smith has worked for the American Physical Society in the JournalInformation Systems Department since 1995, supporting the onlinetransformation of the peer review process and related activities for thePhysical Review journals. His current position as lead data analyst involvescollecting... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 10:45am - 11:10am
Stage 1

11:15am

Finding Buried Treasures – The Quest to PIDify Affiliations in Data Pubs
Dryad, like many other initiatives in this space, has a big problem: we can’t find institutional affiliations for data publications. And with this missing corpus, we are missing opportunities like institutional involvement and open source reporting on research data. Enter, Research Organization Registry (ROR)! A community led project to develop a unique identifier for every research organization in the world. With this open infrastructure, we believe we can trace back and map research output by institution for Dryad datasets. By bringing organizational identifiers into a platform like Dryad, we can think about interconnecting PIDs and improving our metadata. Let's discuss how we can harness the power of organizational PIDs to help locate these buried treasures that will allow for us to address long standing and urgent needs for institutions, libraries, and researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager/Research Data Specialist, California Digital Library - CDL
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library - CDL


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:15am - 11:40am
Stage 1

11:15am

The Ups and Downs of Implementing PIDs for Cultural Heritage in Flanders
Since 2013 PACKED vzw (a non-profit expertise center on digital heritage in Flanders) has been doing research on practical implementation of different PID practices for museums, libraries and archives in the cultural heritage landscape in Flanders. The objective was to ensure sustainable publication of data about heritage collections online and thus make heritage institutions trustworthy digital knowledge sources. This in a sector with almost no IT-knowledge and insufficient funding. On our path we have dealt with conceptual and practical questions like identification of real-life artworks vs. identification of digital data about them, choosing between centralized and decentralized PID-services, choosing the right syntax, introducing management-tools of PIDs into the heritage institutions, creating persistent links between different heritage collections, disseminating the PIDs of museum objects via Wikidata etc. We developed an open source tool for the collectionmanagers in heritage institutions to take control over the resolving of their persistent URI's (https://github.com/PACKED-vzw/resolver and https://github.com/oSoc18/culturizeapp) which still needs a bigger community around it. In the presentation I will show the wins and the fails of our adventures and would like to get feedback and help from the community.

Speakers
avatar for Alina Saenko

Alina Saenko

PACKED vzw
I have studied archive management at V.U. Brussels and cultural management at the University of Antwerp. Within PACKED vzw - center of expertise for digital heritage - I currently work on projects around open cultural data, persistent identification and Wikimedia platforms.


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:15am - 11:40am
Stage 2

11:15am

PIDs in the era of AI: service provider perspectives
PIDs bring a great potential for AI-based scholarly tools and services with their interoperability and machine-readability. The output from AI can be presented as derivatives or even new, original contents that may require another PID. Taking an example of Paper Digest (https://www.paper-digest.com), our own AI-based service, we will discuss the challenges we meet in our development and how PIDs could help overcome those challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Yasutomo Takano

Yasutomo Takano

Paper Digest


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:15am - 11:40am
Main Stage

11:45am

Enabling FAIRness with PIDs
Research advances now and into the future depend on data, software and data products being open, accessible and reusable.  While complete success resides in this occurring across the research landscape, every domain has approached this problem and related opportunities in different ways.  With critical importance placed on discoverable and usable data, the Earth and space sciences are developing community approaches to cultivating a culture that values data sustainability.

The American Geophysical Union, with support from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, convened the Enabling FAIR Data project in late 2017 to develop standards that will connect researchers, publishers, and data repositories in the Earth and space sciences to enable FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data on a large scale.  Crucially, this effort gathered participants from across the Earth and space science landscape; researchers, repositories, publishers, funders, and infrastructure.  A number of agreed-upon best practices have emerged and often revolve around persistent identifiers; metadata and identifier standards; data services; common taxonomies; landing pages at repositories to expose the metadata and standard repository information; standard data citation; and standard integration into editorial peer review workflows.

A second project has been proposed that would pair transdisciplinary science-synthesis teams with a data science teams from five nations, allowing for assessment of data linkages including examining repositories, journals, and other infrastructure that allows data citation and attribution to assess the extent that data and PIDs are FAIR and when reused, that scientists receive the proper attribution and credit. Overall this work will provide a broad landscape of practices, identify where improvements are needed and can be most efficiently implemented and can provide the most benefit.

This talk will provide an overview of the project(s) outcomes to date, including the significant support for PID adoption and integration throughout the community.  It will also present several calls to action for participants, seeking to enable other communities to convene similar efforts and PID enthusiasm. 

Speakers
avatar for Eric Olson

Eric Olson

Engagement Lead, North America., ORCID
Eric supports ORCID members as they develop new and existing integrations and workflows. Before joining ORCID, Eric worked on the PressForward publishing software at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, where he recruited and trained research organizations to utilize... Read More →
SS

Shelley Stall

American Geophysical Union


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:45am - 12:10pm
Stage 2

11:45am

From Standard to Community Resource – A View on ISNI and Org IDs
Over the last year, the International Standard Name Identifier board have been considering the ways in which ISNI as a system can improve to meet new challenges and become more open and transparent. One particular consideration has been to make ISNIs a better solution for organisation identifiers. The British Library as an ISNI Registration Agency has also been developing tools that make it easier to use for identifying organisations, in response to feedback from national and international collaborators. This session will give PIDapalooza an update on ISNI and British Library activities over the past year and demonstrate how we are working to get a wider buy-in on persistent identification of organisations early on – including how we’re attempting to work with funders to embed PID practice.

Speakers
TR

Torsten Reimer

Dr Torsten Reimer is Head of Research Services at the British Library. He is responsible for developing the services and contemporary collections through which the BL supports individual researchers and research organisations, online and onsite. This portfolio includes DataCite UK... Read More →
FM

Frances Madden

Research Identifiers Lead, British Library
Frances Madden is Research Identifiers Lead at The British Library, overseeing the BL's contribution to the FREYA project. Her role includes looking at integrating persistent identifiers into the BL's systems and representing the humanities and social sciences sectors within FREYA... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:45am - 12:10pm
Main Stage

11:45am

Indexing the world's citations using Open Citation Identifiers
Open Citation Identifiers (OCIs) were launched at PIDapalooza 2018.  This year's presentation will discuss progress in their use over the intervening year, particularly their structure, formal definition, recognition and uptake.  OCIs are listed among recognised PIDs by the FREYA project (https://www.project-freya.eu/en/deliverables/freya_d3-1.pdf).  OpenCitations has assigned OCIs to citations in major databases of open citations, including Crossref, Wikidata and the OpenCitations Corpus, and has then use these to construct OpenCitations Indexes of these databases, for example COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref DOI-to-DOI Citations (http://opencitations.net/index/coci).  These indexes can then be use to navigate and visualize the citation networks.  

Speakers
avatar for David Shotton

David Shotton

Co-Director, OpenCitations
David Shotton is Co-Director of the OpenCitations Project, a founding member of the Initiative for Open Citations, and one of the main developers of the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies, a suite of OWL-DL ontologies to serve the academic publishing domain. Originally... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 11:45am - 12:10pm
Stage 1

12:15pm

Lunch
Thursday January 24, 2019 12:15pm - 1:15pm

1:15pm

Asclepias: Flower power for software citation
Asclepias is a project between CERN/Zenodo, NASA ADS and AAS to promote scientific software into an identifiable, citable, and preservable object. We are focusing upon the needs of two of the most important roles researchers play in the scholarly ecosystem: authors of scholarly manuscripts and developers of scientific software. We are building a technical framework and promoting a set of social practices that will help to manage some of the problems associated with software citations, which include software versions, release specific authorship, synonymous object identifiers, and best practices for journal references markup. Our technical solution provides a flexible and reusable service that, as first step, will connect Zenodo[1] and ADS[2] systems using the Scholix[3] framework as the interoperability communication protocol to share scholarly PID-based links.
[1] https://zenodo.org
[2] https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu
[3] http://www.scholix.org

Speakers
avatar for Jose Benito Gonzalez Lopez

Jose Benito Gonzalez Lopez

CERN
José Benito González López leads the Digital Repositories (DR) section at CERN. The DR section is a group of enthusiastic software engineers that develop and maintain Invenio (inveniosoftware.org), the Open Source framework for large-scale digital repositories. He is responsible... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Main Stage

1:15pm

RAiD 12 months on
At the last Pidapalooza we brought you RAiD, our shiny new PID for Research Activities.
Now, a year(ish) later and having gone through its gawky teenage phase, RAiD is emerging as a new full service, with governance, ISO standard support and general agreement about its value.
But the way has not been without potholes, crocodiles and peril. There have been, and still are, many challenges for RAiD. Some of which will be familiar, and some are specific to Activity ID’s.
 
This talk will look at the first 12 months of the RAiD Project ID and our story of challenges and successes along the way.  Things like:

- Encouraging adoption in times of perilous funding
- Building community trust in a PID service
- Educating around PIDs (outside of research management)
- Nurturing culture change for project centred research
- Fighting for persistence during organisational re-shuffles
- Defining international when you’re based at the bottom of the world

By being candid about the challenges of launching a new persistent ID we endeavour to aid other emerging PIDs, and also to maybe pick the collective mind of the audience for any solutions and shared experience from their own PID stories.

Speakers
SM

Siobhann McCafferty

Australian Access Federation
Project Manager for the Data Life Cycle Framework Project (ARDC, AAF, AARNET) which is making better plumbing for Research Management with PIDs, Plugs and stores.  Based in Brisbane, Australia.


Thursday January 24, 2019 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Stage 1

1:15pm

Let's ROR Together!
ROR is the Research Organization Registry, a community-led project to develop an open, sustainable, usable, and unique identifier for every research organization in the world. We are building open, stakeholder-governed infrastructure for research organization identifiers and their associated metadata and we just released a working prototype that's ready for people to use. Join us for a fun and interactive session exploring the challenges with organizational identifiers and how ROR is addressing them.

Speakers
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCIte
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager/Research Data Specialist, California Digital Library - CDL
GH

Ginny Hendricks

Director of Member and Community Outreach, Crossref
avatar for Suze Kundu

Suze Kundu

Head of Public Engagement, Digital Science
A recovering academic with a passion for public engagement, I've been at Digital Science for five months now having left lab life behind. At this, my first PIDapalooza, I'll be on a steep learning curve to try and understand all things PID. Find out how well (or not) I have done in... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 1:15pm - 1:40pm
Stage 2

1:45pm

PIDs Go To The Movies
The film and television industry has only recently embraced PIDs. The original desire was to improve efficiency and reduce the errors that result from requiring human intervention in the long and complex supply chain that gets a movie from the studio to a consumer. Much of the supply chain now uses EIDR, a DOI-based PID. Now that there is a critical mass of EIDR IDs for film and television, other applications have started to emerge. One class of applications uses EIDR as a cross-reference across other identifiers (IMDB, Rotten Tomatoes, national film archive numbers, Wikidata, and the like.) Identifiers are only part of the problem here, of course, which leads to another set of applications that use these cross-referenced identifiers to collect and collate data from multiple sources and present it in a usable, unified format. I'll touch briefly on the structure of EIDR IDs and how they fulfill their original purpose, then spend most of the time on the cross-referencing and data aggregation aspects, using examples from the industry and outside research.

Speakers
RD

Raymond Drewry

Principal Scientist, MovieLabs/EIDR


Thursday January 24, 2019 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Stage 1

1:45pm

Persistent Identifiers, MARC records and Cambridge University Press
Within MARC records, two kinds of persistent identifiers always come to mind: ISBNs and URLs.
At Cambridge University Press, we give maximum priority to the accuracy of our metadata, in order to guarantee the best discoverability of our resources.
In this talk, Concetta La Spada, Senior Library Data Analyst, trained Cataloguer and Librarian, will share her tale about the long journey of re-cataloguing our eBooks collections and the importance of correct metadata across systems. An ISBN in the wrong place at the wrong time can be a calamity!
Also, what happens when a URL syntax is changed and everyone needs to be notified?
Come and see Concetta’s (horror?) tale!

Speakers
avatar for Concetta La Spada

Concetta La Spada

Library Data Analyst, Cambridge University Press
A native of Sicily in Italy, Concetta completed her BA in Conservation of Cultural Heritage in 2007 at the University of Messina. During her university years she worked in various libraries and cultural institutions in Italy. She completed her MA in Archival and Library Science at... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Stage 2

1:45pm

Conference PIDs - Getting Techy
This session will provide an update on the CrossRef/DataCite group on Conference/Project IDs and will present the results achieved since the previous PIDapalooza till now. As the specs are largely DONE, we'll update the community also on the work we start in the technical implementation group. Read the CrossRef post for more info about the group:
https://www.crossref.org/working-groups/conferences-projects/

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref Director of Strategic Initiatives
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Crossref, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including Similarity Check, Crossmark, ORCID and the Open Funder Registry. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology... Read More →
avatar for Aliaksandr Birukou

Aliaksandr Birukou

Executive Editors, Springer Nature
Aliaksandr Birukou works as Executive Editor, Computer Science at Springer, where he leads a team publishing CS proceedings and doing innovation projects in publishing. Aliaksandr chairs the CrossRef/DataCite conference identifiers and project identifiers group and is in the executive... Read More →
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite



Thursday January 24, 2019 1:45pm - 2:10pm
Main Stage

2:15pm

Architecting Attribution
Open science, team science, and a drive to understand meaningful outcomes have transformed research at all levels. It is not sufficient to consider scholarship simply from the perspective of papers written, citations garnered, and grant dollars awarded.  We need a more nuanced characterization and contextualization of contributions of varying types and intensities that are critical to power research.  Unfortunately, little infrastructure exists to identify, aggregate, present, and understand the impact of these contributions. Moreover, these challenges are technical as well as social and require an approach that assimilates cultural perspectives for investigators and organizations, alike. Here we will present ongoing work through the US National Center for Data to Health (CD2H) to address these challenges, including a discussion of the role of PIDs, contributor roles and assertions, and stakeholders and systems to recognize and credit a diverse complement of work.
 

Speakers
KH

Kristi Holmes

Northwestern University


Thursday January 24, 2019 2:15pm - 2:40pm
Stage 1

2:15pm

Cobaltmetrics: Web-scale PID-centric Altmetrics
There is a severe lack of diversity in altmetrics, so we are setting the new standard for citation tracking with Cobaltmetrics. The web is our corpus, and we index all URIs and typed identifiers as first-class citations.

We presented Cobaltmetrics for the very first time a year ago at PIDapalooza in Girona. A lot has changed since then in order to produce a corpus that is balanced and inclusive. We mine data in over 180 languages, we unroll short URLs and proxy URLs from over 175 services, and we crack open URLs to extract persistent identifiers.

We received invaluable feedback last year, and we think it's time for an update. We will present the most recent features and APIs, including our free altmetrics API, and our free URI transmutation API that converts between 50+ types of PIDs. We will also present upcoming features, e.g. an API that gives alerts for retracted publications, and promising collaborations like our partnership with the AI-powered summarizer Paper Digest.


Thursday January 24, 2019 2:15pm - 2:40pm
Main Stage

2:15pm

Adventure Time: the PID community challenge
PIDs are a core component of open research across the global scholarly communications ecosystem. They play a critical role in improving the discovery, linkage, retrieval, navigation, access and citation of the research resources and related information that they identify. However, the full potential of PIDs is yet to be realised.

Through two workshops – one in Singapore and one in the UK – members of the international PID community have been working together to discuss and address key challenges of PIDs in research, including:
  • Building trust in an environment where PID systems continue to proliferate
  • Embedding the use of PIDs in research workflows and harnessing the power of connecting PIDs
  • Increasing the adoption of PIDs by researchers and research organisations through a streamlined and internationally coordinated approach to communication
This session will provide a report back on the nature and outcomes of workshop discussions with a view to building on the successes to date.


Speakers
avatar for Christopher Brown

Christopher Brown

Senior Co-Design Manager, Jisc
Research data, research data management, organisational identifiers, open research, open science, standards, Jisc, RDA-UK.
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons is Associate Director, Skilled Workforce with the Australian Research Data Commons. She has many years experience building and supporting PIDs and PID services and is actively engaged in a wide range of PID infrastructure/initiatives such as Scholix, DataCite, IGSN... Read More →
avatar for Ricarda Braukmann

Ricarda Braukmann

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)


Thursday January 24, 2019 2:15pm - 2:40pm
Stage 2
  • about Research data, research data management, organisational identifiers, open research, open science, standards, Jisc, RDA-UK.

2:45pm

Break
Thursday January 24, 2019 2:45pm - 3:00pm

3:00pm

Why prizes and their citations deserve a persistent identifier of their own
Prizes are important indicators of esteem in research, and they deserve a persistent primary record of their own.  

 * Award citation information is needed throughout the sector, all the time

To name a few examples, institutions aggregate prizes from their alumni over time to build a story about the minds they have educated, and how welcoming their research environment is to support creativity. Prizes are built into university rankings and accreditation processes.  To tell these stories easily, award citation information needs to be easily available.

* Award citations should be richly described records

An award citation is more than just a date, award, and link to a person and awarding body. A citation links to the research that it acknowledges. Upon acceptance award, often an occasional speech is recorded. The best way to capture award citations in all of the richness they deserve is to establish normative metadata practices based around the minting of a persistent identifier.

* Award citations are the historical signposts through which society understands research progress. These signposts deserve a permanent digital record.

* Creating transparency around on prizes can help improve research culture

At their best, prizes recognise a diversity of research achievement in society from literature to physics and everything in between. It has also been observed that prizes are being awarded to a concentrated set of elite researchers. By making prize awardee information more discoverable, more informed decisions about what prizes to award, and who to award them to can be made.

*The flow of prize information through the research systems is currently significantly hampered. It needs fixing.

Wikidata is perhaps the best secondary source of prize information.  Consider how it gets there. What information does it loose along the way?  A significant amount work could be reduced by building information flows around the authority that persistent records provide.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Porter

Simon Porter

VP Academic Relationships and Knowledge Architecture, Digital Science
Simon Porter is the Director of Innovation at Digital Science. Three years ago, Simon came to Digital Science from the University of Melbourne, where he worked for 15 years in roles spanning the Library, Research Administration, and Information Technology. Beginning from a core strength... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Stage 1

3:00pm

The Yin and Yang of PIDs
This interactive, hour-long session on communicating about PIDs to researchers will be divided into two halves. The first will look at the yin -- the “dark side”! -- of PIDs. After hearing a couple of "horror stories from the session leaders, participants will be invited to share their own experiences of PID communication challenges. What went wrong? How did they address the issue? What did they learn from the experience? How can we all help ensure fewer PID problems in future?

The second half will focus on the yang -- positive PID stories and communication strategies. Following the same structure as the first part, this time around we will be sharing our success stories.  What worked -- and how do you know it did? Why did it work? Is it replicable by other organizations?

Please come to this session with at least one PID story to share -- good or bad -- and be ready for a lively discussion of how we can learn from our shared experiences to tell a more consistent and evidence-based PID story to researchers and make our communications with them more successful.

Session organizers: Helena Cousijn (DataCite), Ginny Hendricks (Crossref), Alice Meadows (ORCID)

Speakers
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCIte
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Community Outreach, Crossref
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 


Thursday January 24, 2019 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Stage 2

3:00pm

FREYA proudly presents: The power of PIDs
FREYA is a 3-year EU project that aims to build the infrastructure for persistent identifiers (PIDs) as a core component of Open Science. The work of FREYA will improve discovery, navigation, retrieval, and access of research resources. The project team is currently working on the establishment of new PID types, and on connecting existing and new PIDs into a PID Graph. PIDapalooza is the place to be to discuss our work with other PID-tellectuals and provide new directions to it.

Our session covers three parts which will be hosted by speakers from various FREYA partners: First, we will start with a discussion lead by Christine Ferguson (EBI) on the use cases for new PID types FREYA has recently collected. Then, Martin Fenner (Datacite) will present how new and existing PIDs can be integrated into the PID Graph that FREYA is developing. Lastly, Eliane Fankhauser (DANS) will encourage the PIDapaloozans to join the PID Forum to continue the discussion during and after the festival season.                              
                   
Note to the organisers: Please note that this session can stand alone, but would also work well in tandem with another session proposed by the FREYA project (see separate proposal relating to the PIDagogy of FREYA).     

Speakers
avatar for Ricarda Braukmann

Ricarda Braukmann

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
EF

Eliane Fankhauser

Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS-KNAW)
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Christine Ferguson

Christine Ferguson

Information Scientist, EMBL-EBI
PIDs for the life sciencesProject FREYA


Thursday January 24, 2019 3:00pm - 3:55pm
Main Stage

4:00pm

PIDapalooza Temperature Check
This is your chance to give us your feedback on PIDapalooza -- the good, the bad, and the ugly! We'll be using Sli.do to gather information that will help us shape future events. 

Speakers
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCIte
GH

Ginny Hendricks

Director of Member and Community Outreach, Crossref


Thursday January 24, 2019 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Main Stage

4:15pm

And... That's a (PID) Wrap
Suze Kundu of Digital Science will be giving this year's PIDapalooza wrap-up talk -- your chance to find out what happened at some of the sessions you didn't get to.

Speakers
avatar for Suze Kundu

Suze Kundu

Head of Public Engagement, Digital Science
A recovering academic with a passion for public engagement, I've been at Digital Science for five months now having left lab life behind. At this, my first PIDapalooza, I'll be on a steep learning curve to try and understand all things PID. Find out how well (or not) I have done in... Read More →


Thursday January 24, 2019 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Main Stage

4:45pm

Closing Ceremony
Thursday January 24, 2019 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Main Stage